FAVORITE THINGS


Note: this list is imperfect and just for fun but I keep it in the hopes that it could be interesting for others and because I don't want to be sucked back into the vortex of social media.

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If you have that Google Cardboard viewer and are curious what it might be like to travel into a black hole, this is worth 10 minutes.
Science
Some useful data-driven tools to empower tenants in NYC, built by an isnpiring group of civic coders.
Coding
Two games that still hold up Oregon Trail and Minesweeper.
Tomfoolery
Mindbending and engrossing deep dives into cool math by Michael Stevens, AKA Vsauce: Which Way is Down? and Fixed Points.
Math
Dumb funny: A bat trapped in Irish family's kitchen.
Tomfoolery
Adam Savage and Michael Stevens on the Brachistochrone curve. "That works in practice but how does it work in theory?"
Science
Dafi K├╝hne has one amazing printmaking studio in the Swiss Alps and a perfect little video series on his craft. Here's a good one.
Design
Excellent online lessons for changing your basic math perspective: Exploding Dots.
Math
A couple highlights from Better Explained on rethinking mathematical approaches: on Euler's Identity and more broadly, imaginary numbers.
Math
Infinite sets to stretch your brain.
Math
This episode of the 10,000 Hours podcast (on effective altruism) is a fascinating talk with Claire Walsh, Senior Policy Manager at J-PAL Global at MIT, on using randomized controlled trials to empirically evaluate policies and programs in the developing world governments to most effectively reduce global poverty.
Social Impact
A superub and thought-provoking article in NYT Magazine on how competing explanaitions for beauty in nature are causing a stir in evolutionary biology.
Science
A simple explainer by the legendary Hans Rosling on how global population will increase for a while, then stabilize.
Science
The foundational book on one of my favorite topics, behavioral science: Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman.
Science
Engrossing book on Alan Turing's 1936 paper, "On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem": Turing's Vision: The Birth of Computer Science by Christopher Bernhardt.
Science

Thanks for reading. Have a nice day.  —  "The details are not the details. They make the design." —Charles Eames